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Would you spend £18,200 on a Clio 182?



davo172

ClioSport Club Member
  TCR'd 172
There’s loads on here already. Storm grey 182. AST and PMS for most stuff, caged, ITB’s, etc etc every nut and bolt on it has been apart and put back together again.

Lol never seen it!! Will have a look ?
 
  Land Rover
When did this forum decide building the a high spec out of the box Clio would be superseded by a f**king Volkswagen Up! ffs :(

Well, not me. But if you’d actually driven the VW Up GTi you’d find it was very similar to a FF182
As l have both.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tom
  Land Rover
Is your 182 broken ? ??

Ha, sorry pal just me being a little anti-VW

lol no....but the VW has a similar old school fun hot hatch feel about it, and the suspension is similar.
And it has loads of torque from pretty much 1,000 rpm such that it feels faster than it is.
 

Touring_Rob

ClioSport Club Member
I like the concept - I think if you were discussing something like a 205 gti people would be more on board with it. I also don't necessarily think you want your base R&D to be from a cup racer.

The shell isn't prone to rust (compared with many), I would actually opt to have the cars fully stripped and media blasted, leaving much of the factory coating on the inner panels - dipping typically removes coatings from areas you would find it hard to reinstate.

Most of the design work will go into the 6 speed idea and NVH imo, sorting the inner wing area out properly in a factory like fashion. I also would not (personally) go through with itb's and would look more into a low boost option with proper dual variable cam timing.

The killer would be to register as a small production vehicle company and to have the final product (some how) re-registered and tested to the new emission standards. This would mean the little 182 could (maybe?) be compliant with the soon to be enforced ultra low emission zones which I am convinced will spread over the next 10 years to areas well outside that of London - effectively forcing people to scrap many 90's and 00's iconic cars. I am really worried about the fate of amazing cars such as the E46 M3 etc.

Areas I would improve if I was doing it:
  1. Lower cruising RPM - 6th gear
  2. More low rpm torque without loosing the 'on cam' character of the engine (could be done with cleaver boost control)
  3. Faster steering with a touch more feel, turn in is lacking compared with other similar cars, steering would still be acceptable if heavier
  4. More suspension compliance without compromising on handling etc. A little less roll (even on cup gear) would be nice.
  5. Better (generally) NVH, however Renault did do a good job in places.
  6. More characterful exhaust note without being offensively loud.
  7. Lighter clutch
  8. Substantially improved gear lever position and feel.
  9. Better headlights.

If it helps at all (send me a private message) I am an electro/mechanical design engineer and have some good mates in some potentially useful areas; seat designer who has also worked with Singer, carbon guy who specialises in the design of forged carbon composites and has done design and supply work for Mclarren and RR recently amongst others and a friends father who works for the company that builds the engines for Eagle (the Etype). Like you I really like the 182 because its above all else fun, I have other fun cars but jump in this for the commuting battle.

Its well worth having a look into forged/compression moulded carbon as it looks awesome and has many advantages over regular carbon (primarily cost!). Its ideal for things like spoilers, splitters, door handles and interior trim.

All the best of luck
Rob,

Walt-Siegl-David-Yurman-forged-Carbon-Moto-290px.jpg
AmazingGreat-LAMBORGHINI-HURACAN-CARBON-FORGED-INTERIOR-KIT-4T0898500-2017-20182018-201920172018.jpg
 

R3k1355

ClioSport Club Member
If it's got to pass modern emissions standards you might be in for a hard time, I assume that means meeting Euro 6 emissions standards on a Euro 3 engine
 

Touring_Rob

ClioSport Club Member
If it's got to pass modern emissions standards you might be in for a hard time, I assume that means meeting Euro 6 emissions standards on a Euro 3 engine

Wouldn't be using the same engine to achieve that. Would be looking at a later lump which passes testing already. Meg 250 etc.

Don't know how reasonable that is at all, but it would certainly be a big selling point.
 

Touring_Rob

ClioSport Club Member
Sorting out the driving position should be top priority.

tbf I don't find it too bad, and would hope that with some proper seats/frames the position would be sorted just by being lower. Im not tall so that helps. I actually find it more annoying if the passenger is tall to the point that I'm looking for a LHD drivers seat to install. Also think the driving position would be more comfortable if the gear leaver wasn't a bit of a stretch.
 

Kev@KAM

ClioSport Trader
  Badass Toyota
Interesting idea.
Some pointers. As mentioned above, dipping will remove the galvanising and you have to drill into all the structural pockets. A light media blast and repair of any rust would be cheaper and less harmful to the shell.

You dont want to seam weld a road car. It wont be comfortable. Strengthen weak points but short of putting in a roll cage its not really going to achieve a great deal.

The engine is old hat. I'd look into dropping the Megane 4 RS engine into the car. Better for emissions, good power, should be stronger than previous generations and (i think is alloy so lighter)...
Realistically you cannot get the power needed from throttlebodies without looking at aftermarket cams and thats not a normal everyday car route. The noise is great but it will be compared to modern hatches and therefore will need to compete on fuel consumption as well as performance. As sad as I find it...normally aspirated cars have had their day.

Cup racer suspension was nice but brutally harsh. Realistically you could do a custom front hub to sort the roll centre easily enough. Getting it lighter than the originals would help finesse on the bumps.
And dampers...I've already had aftermarket race electronic dampers developed for the chassis. not cheap but it can even be driver controlled without the need to get out the car. It could easily be tailored for the road market

Brakes. Some lightweight 4 pot calipers with some good dust seals will be fine. Its not rocket science that one. As large a pad as possible so the brakes stay cool. Disc size will be compromised somewhat to stay with 15" or 16" wheels.
 

Touring_Rob

ClioSport Club Member
Ask a bloke who owns an E-type if he would like to spend 200K buying a new Eagle.... he will call you crazy.

Ask a rich dude who has always wanted an E-type if he would like to buy a brand new and substantially better Etype... he will bite your hand off.

Same here, asking people who already own the cars maybe isn't the ideal place to pitch.
 
  182 Turbo
you could always buy a cup racer for around 10k which has alot of awesome discontinued parts that youll never be able to source for a clio you're building otherwise, and then it would have a bit of limited edition factor to it that cant be replicated, and a part of 1*2 history
 

Kev@KAM

ClioSport Trader
  Badass Toyota
you could always buy a cup racer for around 10k which has alot of awesome discontinued parts that youll never be able to source for a clio you're building otherwise, and then it would have a bit of limited edition factor to it that cant be replicated, and a part of 1*2 history
not really fun to drive anywhere but on track!
Gearbox would however be a lot of fun
 

Kev@KAM

ClioSport Trader
  Badass Toyota
Something like this would sort the roll centre geometry and allow an examination on kingpin and scrub angles
 

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bloke

ClioSport Club Member
  dan's cast offs.
if i was going to look at improving/updating i'd look at double wishbone suspension. be a bit of a faff but would be worth it in the end.
 

Kev@KAM

ClioSport Trader
  Badass Toyota
if i was going to look at improving/updating i'd look at double wishbone suspension. be a bit of a faff but would be worth it in the end.

I feel like a party pooper but having gone this route on my car. It will cost around £15k to get designed and fabricated and not massively advantagous if keeping the track width original. Money would be best spent on lightweight wheels, hubs and struts and modern technologies such as digressive valving, electronic damping control, monotube dampers etc. Think Sachs Dampers but on steriods.
 

bloke

ClioSport Club Member
  dan's cast offs.
I feel like a party pooper but having gone this route on my car. It will cost around £15k to get designed and fabricated and not massively advantagous if keeping the track width original. Money would be best spent on lightweight wheels, hubs and struts and modern technologies such as digressive valving, electronic damping control, monotube dampers etc. Think Sachs Dampers but on steriods.


I'd steal bits of something and do it that way but even then it would cost silly money!!!!

I've looked at getting a basic independent rear trailing arm set up done and even that starts to get a bit of a silly price.
 

Touring_Rob

ClioSport Club Member
I'd steal bits of something and do it that way but even then it would cost silly money!!!!

I've looked at getting a basic independent rear trailing arm set up done and even that starts to get a bit of a silly price.

I don't think the trouble is in designing it etc however the implications of a component failure are quite high. You design a hub/trailing arm, sell it and it fails badly. Customer crashes and sues you for negligence, or worse dies and their family/insurance firm sue you.
 

bloke

ClioSport Club Member
  dan's cast offs.
I don't think the trouble is in designing it etc however the implications of a component failure are quite high. You design a hub/trailing arm, sell it and it fails badly. Customer crashes and sues you for negligence, or worse dies and their family/insurance firm sue you.


That's what insurance is for though.
 
  Turbos.
I like the concept - I think if you were discussing something like a 205 gti people would be more on board with it. I also don't necessarily think you want your base R&D to be from a cup racer.

The shell isn't prone to rust (compared with many), I would actually opt to have the cars fully stripped and media blasted, leaving much of the factory coating on the inner panels - dipping typically removes coatings from areas you would find it hard to reinstate.

Most of the design work will go into the 6 speed idea and NVH imo, sorting the inner wing area out properly in a factory like fashion. I also would not (personally) go through with itb's and would look more into a low boost option with proper dual variable cam timing.

The killer would be to register as a small production vehicle company and to have the final product (some how) re-registered and tested to the new emission standards. This would mean the little 182 could (maybe?) be compliant with the soon to be enforced ultra low emission zones which I am convinced will spread over the next 10 years to areas well outside that of London - effectively forcing people to scrap many 90's and 00's iconic cars. I am really worried about the fate of amazing cars such as the E46 M3 etc.

Areas I would improve if I was doing it:
  1. Lower cruising RPM - 6th gear
  2. More low rpm torque without loosing the 'on cam' character of the engine (could be done with cleaver boost control)
  3. Faster steering with a touch more feel, turn in is lacking compared with other similar cars, steering would still be acceptable if heavier
  4. More suspension compliance without compromising on handling etc. A little less roll (even on cup gear) would be nice.
  5. Better (generally) NVH, however Renault did do a good job in places.
  6. More characterful exhaust note without being offensively loud.
  7. Lighter clutch
  8. Substantially improved gear lever position and feel.
  9. Better headlights.

If it helps at all (send me a private message) I am an electro/mechanical design engineer and have some good mates in some potentially useful areas; seat designer who has also worked with Singer, carbon guy who specialises in the design of forged carbon composites and has done design and supply work for Mclarren and RR recently amongst others and a friends father who works for the company that builds the engines for Eagle (the Etype). Like you I really like the 182 because its above all else fun, I have other fun cars but jump in this for the commuting battle.

Its well worth having a look into forged/compression moulded carbon as it looks awesome and has many advantages over regular carbon (primarily cost!). Its ideal for things like spoilers, splitters, door handles and interior trim.

All the best of luck
Rob,

View attachment 1389676View attachment 1389677

Funnily enough, I own a Huracan Performante and forged carbon was something I was thinking of as making a feature point. Is your guy UK based? I know of a very good place in the USA, and am getting some bits for my Lamborghini because a) I want more carbon and b) to assess it's quality.

Thanks everybody for the feedback. I would not be registering as a car company. You don't need to to offer finance or warranty. You can cover liability with waivers and insurance.
 

Touring_Rob

ClioSport Club Member
Funnily enough, I own a Huracan Performante and forged carbon was something I was thinking of as making a feature point. Is your guy UK based? I know of a very good place in the USA, and am getting some bits for my Lamborghini because a) I want more carbon and b) to assess it's quality.

Thanks everybody for the feedback. I would not be registering as a car company. You don't need to to offer finance or warranty. You can cover liability with waivers and insurance.

Yes he is, he is currently making some incredibly cool speed boat suspension seats too which won the red dot award recently - talented guy. Based near Chiswick, where are you?

He does the design work, not the molding. Molding is done in the UK for small quantity parts and in China for higher quantities however he has done the bulk of R&D over the last 10 years and knows a lot about the subject. Send me a private message if you would like more info/contact details.

All the best
Rob,
 


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