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Fred and James’ Clio 182 Racecar Project



ZachB

ClioSport Club Member
  182
Thanks.

Currently it just has a bleed nipple in there but my plan is to put a pressure sensor in there, thought I would get the fitting in whilst doing the pipe work.
Ah ok cool. I thought about fitting a longacre pressure gauge some time ago but I’ve gone abs.
 

Twingo 1??

ClioSport Club Member
  Twingo 133 Cup,
Nice job on the lines! I have them to do on the Twingo next. Got lots of questions.

Where did you get the parts?

What tools made the job easier?

Does the clio not have a return fuel line?

Did you buy the connector that goes into the tank?

I am very nervous about doing it but it would cost a fortune to send it away to get done. Also wish I had a nice garage like that lol
 

FPummell

ClioSport Club Member
Nice job on the lines! I have them to do on the Twingo next. Got lots of questions.

Where did you get the parts?

What tools made the job easier?

Does the clio not have a return fuel line?

Did you buy the connector that goes into the tank?

I am very nervous about doing it but it would cost a fortune to send it away to get done. Also wish I had a nice garage like that lol
Thanks.

Got both fuel and brake lines from Atec (https://atec-autotechnik.com/), have A look at their catalogue, was great for working out what I needed. I still had a fair few questions but Kieron there was really patient with me and sorted me out as I had missed some bits I needed. And then they were great sorting the flexi fuel lines out so couldn’t recommend them enough.

These were the tools I used. Along with a sealey tools flare tool.

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So for the aluminium hard lines larger bender, tube cutter, deburring tool.
Brake hard lines, small bender, tube cutter, deburring tool, and outer coating removal tool.
Fuel flexi lines just need a hacksaw, I used a bandsaw which worked well.
Brake flexi lines hacksaw and the mandrel tool which is specific for dash 3 sized line. This is used to separate the braided part of the line away from the inner tube, made them nice and easy to do.

The Clio does not have a return line as standard but I have already ran a second line for when we go to ITBs. Not quite sure the benefit of have a return line to be honest but it’s there if needed.

So the tank connector is usually a straight connector but as I cut the carbon canister out of the system I had a right angled connector from that. So I just reused a connector which was already on another part of the standard system. I could only find a replacement on eBay from China. Have a search for ‘7.89mm ID6 fuel fitting’ on eBay and you’ll find what you need.

The hardest part was bending the long runs in one length, brake lines are easy than the aluminium fuel line but even the aluminium hard lines have a little bit of give in them to get them lined up perfectly.

Give me a shout if you want to know any more.
 

David172

ClioSport Club Member
  Clio 172 M135i
The U piece of hose for bypassing the heater matrix, was that an off the shelf part or was it cut down from another piece? Need the same for mine 😊
 

Danith

ClioSport Club Member
  VRS 230 & Ep3
This is how it's done. Proper build. I'd love to do this one day when I get a unit or garage big enough.

Quite the escalation tho:

Buy track car - oh no gearbox bearing has gone - f**k it, full nut and bolt resto :ROFLMAO:
 

FPummell

ClioSport Club Member
The U piece of hose for bypassing the heater matrix, was that an off the shelf part or was it cut down from another piece? Need the same for mine 😊
I just bought a single u bend piece and then cut down to length. The rest of the pipes are just a standard Clio set.

Pretty sure this is the actual one I bought but there are plenty of options.

 

FPummell

ClioSport Club Member
This is how it's done. Proper build. I'd love to do this one day when I get a unit or garage big enough.

Quite the escalation tho:

Buy track car - oh no gearbox bearing has gone - f**k it, full nut and bolt resto :ROFLMAO:
Thanks.

Haha, it did just creep up on us. I would have liked to have driven it completely stock before doing the work but apart from that no regrets with the direction we have gone so far.
 

Touring_Rob

ClioSport Club Member
  182, E46 M3, 1000RR
Part of the fun for me is building and working on these cars and I definitely wouldn't have the budget to pay someone else to build it anyway. That said, I'm still easily into £20k. For that money though I have a very competitive car that is always at the sharp end of 30-40 car grids.

Also worth mentioning that if you are starting from scratch, spending money on safety really can't be overstated. As witnessed by one of our race colleagues last weekend at Thruxton which he managed to walk away from.

f**k that! He did really well. Bet the marshals absolutely filled their orange pants. Glad he walked away.
 

Touring_Rob

ClioSport Club Member
  182, E46 M3, 1000RR
f**k that! He did really well. Bet the marshals absolutely filled their orange pants. Glad he walked away.
I recon one of the biggest takeaways from that is to strap extinguishers down better, he's lucky it never took him out. Does anyone know if there was a mech failure which caused the crash? Early on he looked to have decent rear end grip but last couple of corners was sliding about a fair bit more, looks to early to be too much heat in the tyres? I honestly though he had caught it in time and kept his foot in like a champ.
 

robzracing

ClioSport Club Member
I spoke to him after. It was definitely cold tyres and trying too hard.
Nick Hamilton had an almost identical off a few years before in a Clio Cup. Right down to the fire extinguisher coming loose!
You can find it on YouTube


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

FPummell

ClioSport Club Member
Post number 12.

Last thing left to do before turning it on was fluids, exhaust, air intake manifold and electrics.

Started work on the battery wiring. Gone with an Odyssey PC680 located behind the passenger seat and used a bulkhead post thing instead of just using a grommet, should do the job. Attached the main fuse to the side of the battery bracket.

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Then it was time to get the looms out after putting them away 18 months ago.

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Plugged everything in (well so I thought) and was ready to give it ago.

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So engine turned over straight away but wasn’t firing. Decided to check if fuel pump was working and it had no power. So plugged my OBD reader in and it wasn't detecting any rpm, checked the crank sensor and we didn’t have one so then had to route around a number of boxes to find the old one. Luckily we still had it. So plugged that in and now getting power to the fuel pump.

Cranked the engine over for a good 30 seconds and still nothing. So disconnected the fuel line to the rail to see if there was fuel, there wasn’t. So with the fuel line into a bucket cranked the engine over for max 5 seconds and fuel started to come out. So fuel line back on and cranked the engine over again and it came to life.

Once running it was idling quite high and when you touched the throttle it wouldn’t reduce it’s speed, but looked at the intake manifold and it has 3 tube ports which weren‘t connected to anything so a bit of tape around these to block them off and the idle was back to normal.

So here is the customary startup video, no doubt many on here already but it was a great moment for us both and to say we were pleased was an understatement.

Next step was cutting out lots of wires and will explain the plan for that.

 

FPummell

ClioSport Club Member
Post number 13.

Since the car is now running I wanted to tackle the wiring.

The initial plan is to run the car with the standard ECU until we rebuild the engine with ITBs, cam etc then will go to a stand-alone ecu, but no idea when we will do that, could be a while off. So we have decided step one would be to strip the original loom down as much as possible and include a digital dash and power distribution module. So the PDM will control as much as possible but still need to work out exactly how the PDM will fit in with the existing ecu/loom, hence whilst stripping the original loom I plan to work out the best way to combine the old and new systems.

Going to go with the ECU Master gear so going to order an ADU7, PMU, gps, battery isolator and CAN keyboard shortly.

I thought it was a good idea to not touch the original looms at all until firing the car up. There was a lot of wires/connectors not connected so first step was to remove all of this and trace the wires back.

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Started with the rear loom (from passenger side connector), all bar the fuel tank connector was to go from this one as the PMU is going to control all lights etc, so will save the connectors to the brake lights to reuse in the new loom. So the rear loom started as this:

92E92730-3F20-4456-A009-2A9B010C382F.jpeg


And ended up with this, 2 wires for fuel level sensor, 1 for fuel pump power and a ground. I will change the large OEM loom connector to one of the DT series connectors. So DTM for 7amps, DT for 13amps max and DTP for 25amps max which happens to fit in with the PMU max channel outputs.

5B0C1617-18BB-4D87-9EBA-0B0D2B5DFE01.jpeg


So connected the loom back into the car and just double checked it still started. But this one didn’t have anything important apart from the fuel pump so wasn't expecting anything to go wrong.

Then started the same process on the dash loom. With this one, kept the 2 dash connectors, throttle, brake, clutch, immobiliser, key, 3 uch connectors, obd port. This was the loom pretty much at the start of the process.

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Halfway through:

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And then pretty much done for the time being:

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8B535BA2-B519-41D8-8CE3-0C1E05944043.jpeg
 

FPummell

ClioSport Club Member
Post number 13 continued.

Next was the same to the engine loom.

So connectors to keep here were:
  • MAP
  • dephaser solenoid / vvt
  • alternator (not sure what this one actually does)
  • oil pressure
  • oil level
  • knock
  • intake air
  • coolant temp
  • crank sensor
  • coil pack
  • Large ecu connector
  • starter motor
  • Lambra sensor 1 and 2
  • reverse sensor
  • relays
  • fuses
This was how it started:

241DD3C5-7096-4379-8978-84D9EE74012F.jpeg


Halfway through:

95E5F751-A4BB-41D9-9EFB-49F143FEEAE3.jpeg


And then with the engine loom back in the car:

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So after the first step of stripping wires from the looms this was the amount of wires I had cut out.

D46D952D-3622-4F16-89A6-4DBF2B4C1B61.jpeg


The car is back up and running now so the next step is to go into more detail with the loom and remove more wires which are redundant. But happy with how the first step with the loom had gone.
 
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